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TA-100 Transducer Amplifier
Compact and versatile amplifier with digital readout

The TA-100 is a compact, stand-alone amplifier for use with all DC-bridge type transducers. Compatible transducers include blood or air pressure, strain gages, force transducer, and accelerometers. A built-in LCD display shows the current measurement as well as a fast-response bar-graph for easy visualization of a changing signal. A standard serial port allows remote data collection using any simple terminal software.

Input connection is via a standard Cannon WK-6-32S six-pin connector (compatible with GrassTM transducers). A wide gain range is provided, consisting of ten calibrated steps and an adjustable vernier attenuator for fine control. This feature allows the unit to be calibrated in real-world physical units (e.g. mmHg).

The TA-100 has a six-position, sharp rolloff, low-pass filter including a mean function. The analog output signal is via a BNC jack. This output voltage is the same as reported on the front panel display. Power to the instrument comes from the included miniature, 120/230V universal 5V power supply. 

A number of transducers are available for use with the TA-100 amplifier. The TXRR series are blood-pressure type transducers for use with blood or other liquids. The PS-1000 series transducers are for use with air or non-corrosive gasses. The PS-1000/A-004 is a sensitive differential transducer suitable for use with a pneumotach for measuring airflow. Unwired connectors are also available for custom transducer connections.

Ordering information:

Part No. Model Description
08-14000 TA-100 Transducer amplifier with power supply, 115/230V
10-04100 DTX-1 Blood-pressure transducer
10-04210 TC-GRA Adapter cable for above transducer

Click here for a complete data sheet in pdf format.

Send mail to  info@cwe-inc.com  with questions or comments about this site or our instruments.
Last modified: October 31, 2012